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The Ineffective Mr. Gong

1 Corinthians 13:1 13:1 If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. — Mr. Gong’s eloquence rang out across the ballroom. The people listened and were amazed at his knowledge and ideas. He coughed and waved his hand about. He continued to speak with grand language about lofty ideas and inspiring stories. After some time, and attendant arrived with a bottle of water. Mr. Gong swiped it from the attendant and said “About @&%#+- time you oaf!” Then he slapped the attendant on the back of the head. No one heard his words after that, they were only shocked at his duality and utter lack of common decency. Mr. Gong was never invited to speak again.

A wise son carries a .22 rifle

Proverbs 13 1   A wise son heeds his father’s instruction, But a scoffer does not listen to rebuke. — Charlie peered across the street. The coast looked clear. He opened the door and grabbed his shotgun. The heft of the weapon reminded him of his father’s advice. “Carry a rifle. Take them out from afar.” What did he know? He died out here didn’t he? What good was a rifle if they managed to get up close? He crossed the street and leaned up against a crumbling law office. Back across, on top of the building Charlie was in, a zombie stood. It looked at him and pointing. It started shrieking. Charlie took aim, but knew the buckshot wouldn’t do any damage at this range. He heard shuffling in the nearby alleyways. Several zombies came out and turned towards Charlie. He took a few down with shotgun blasts, but more came and he needed to reload. As they rushed, he used the shotgun butt to knock some away, but the shrieks summoned more. He reloaded as he ran, but too many came. As he was overtaken, the zombie stood on the distant roof and continued to shriek.

Sanctifed cybernetics

Leviticus 20:7-8 7 Consecrate yourselves, therefore, and be holy, for I am the Lord your God. 8 Keep my statutes and do them; I am the Lord who sanctifies you. — Professor Whittleby examined the tiny cyborgs that roamed in the terrarium. Each of them had an instruction set, but they also had the option to try and determine another method to deal with the dangers that were cohabitated in the terrarium. Daily the cyborgs would face small animals or geological hazard that Whittleby placed in the cyborgs world. Each time the cyborgs encountered one, they would follow the instruction set they had been given, or they would use a decision matrix to take an alternate route to the problem, using experience or randomized bias included in the cyborg’s brain. Whittleby carefully crafted the encounters and hazards to be solved best with his instructions, but this might not be obvious to the cyborgs, who could assess the situation with various viewpoints and memories, weather installed or learned after activation. Whittleby tracked how the cyborgs responded. Some nearly always followed the instructions but to a programed inclination to do so, while many choose their own solutions, sometimes with disasterous results. More interesting were the ones that seemed to learn that even if they came up with what they thought was a better solution, past experience taught them that following the instruction set would lead to a better result, even if the Cyborg couldn’t see it in advance. It was almost if they had a kind of faith that it would always be right. These cyborgs were the most prized by Whittleby and were the ones that eventually were moved onto the next stage of testing.

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